mIRC instructions

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mIRC instructions

Post by Teresa Rowley on Mon Jan 11, 2016 7:24 pm

1. mIRC Setup Guide

Video Tutorial
You can find a video tutorial on setting up mIRC here:
mIRC commented video tutorial with crappy video and audio, teaching you a basic setup for mIRC

Download the client at http://www.mirc.com.

First start and connect

When you start mIRC for the first time, the option window autmatically appears, so that you can fill in your user information. If you clicked it away, open the options window from the top menu clicking Tools, then selecting Options (or press [Alt]+[O]).

⦁ Nickname: Your Handle. Names are usually separated by underscore. Example: John_Doe
⦁ Alternative: An alternative nickname, if the nickname is already taken. You should use your rank and last name. Example: RCT_Doe
⦁ Name: Either your handle or your name. Example: John Doe
⦁ Email: Your email address. Does not have to be a real email. Example: ⦁ johndoe@ascarion.net



Once that is done, click Servers on the left. You will see a list of servers. Click Add to add the Star Wars Combine server. Fill out the appearing form:

⦁ Description: Select a useful recognisable name. Example: SWC-IRC
⦁ IRC-Server: irc.swc-irc.com
⦁ Port: Should be left at 6667.
⦁ Group: Again chose a recognisable name. Example: SWC-IRC
⦁ Password: Leave empty.




When you are done, click Add, then click Select on the right of the server list. You will get back to where you filled in your user data. Click Connect. Now mIRC connects to the server. Usually you will now get a popup window, that shows you a list of favourite channels. You proabably won't need that, so you can deselect Pop up favorites on connect.

Set up your NickServ account

Now it is time to register your handle with nickserv. To do that you enter the following command at the bottom of the window:
Example:
Code:
/msg nickserv register [password] [email] Code:
/ns register guinar johndoe@ascarion.org

Note: /ns is an abbreviation for /msg nickserv.

Once you have correctly done that, NickServ will tell you, that you successfully registered and remind you not to forget your password. Now we also want to register our secondary nickname, the one with our rank. NickServ has a feature to add more nicks to your already registered account. It works like this:

Example:
Code:
/nick [nickname]
/msg nickserv group Code:
/nick RCT_Doe
/ns group


Okay, now you have successfully registered and linked your ranked up nickname. But how is NickServ supposed to know, that it is you, when you disconnect from the server and connect again some other time? Easy. Whenever you connect to the IRC-Server you have to verify your identity by submitting your password. Like so:
Example:
Code:
/msg nickserv identify [password] Code:
/ns identify guinar

Perform
But isn't it a bit annoying to do that every time? Yes it is. Fortunately mIRC enables us to have commands executed automatically whenever we connect to server. It is called “Perform”. Let's activate perform and tell mIRC to identify us whenever we connect to the server.

To do that click Tools, select Options (or press [Alt]+[O]), select Options from the menu on the left. Click Perform.

Now at the top select Enable perform on connect and click Add. From the network list, select the Combine's IRC-Server. If you followed my example, it should be “SWC-IRC”. Then click OK.

Now we can enter the commands to be executed, when we connect to the SWC-IRC-Server. It sometimes happens on IRC, that you loose your connection to the server, but the server doesn't notice. In that case you nickname is already taken. That is one of the reason, why we registered our secondary nick. Now we can use both the primary and secondary nick to make a perform list, that works almost always:

Example:
Code:
/nick [Secondary_Nick]
/nick [Primary_Nick]
/msg nickserv identify [password] Code:
/nick RCT_Doe
/nick John_Doe
/ns identify guinar



Click OK and OK to leave the options menu. We are done. Now you can reconnect to the server to test, if it works as it should. If it all works properly, visit #cmg-empire-help, to gain access to the Imperial main channel. Joining a channel:
Example:
Code:
/join [#channel] Code:
/join #cmg-empire-help



3. List of IRC clients

Below you will find a list of common IRC clients sorted by Operating System. If you want something added to the lists, convince me why I should do that and give me the url.
Wikipedia's ultimate comparison

Table of Contents
1. Windows
2. Mac / OS X
3. Linux
4. iPhone / iOS
5. Android
6. Browser
7. Console


1. Windows
mIRC - Most common Windows IRC client. Make sure to use up to date versions! Due to the high user count, bugs in the program tend to be exploited by viruses etc. Shareware: 30 days of free use, pay afterwards.
http://mirc.co.uk

XChat - Multiplatform client. Windows version is Shareware: 30 days of free use, pay afterwards.
http://xchat.org/

KVIrc - Multiplatform client. Lots of comfort functions. Recommended by Ascarion. Free open software.
http://kvirc.net

Smuxi - Multiplatform client. Allows detaching when away and connecting from mobile/other computers. Based on GTK3+. Free open software.
http://smuxi.im

Quassel - Multiplatform client. Allows detaching when away and connecting from mobile/other computers. Based on QT4/5. Free open software.
http://quassel-irc.org/

IceChat - Rudimentary client. Popular amongst GE members. No unicode support. Freeware.
http://icechat.net



2. Mac / OS X
Colloquy - Most popular Mac Client. Supposed to follow Apple's design philosophies. Freeware.
http://colloquy.info

XChat Aqua - Multiplatform client. Freeware.
http://sourceforge.net/projects/xchataqua/

KVIrc - Multiplatform client. Lots of comfort functions. Recommended by Ascarion. Free open software.
http://kvirc.net

Smuxi - Multiplatform client. Allows detaching when away and connecting from mobile/other computers. Based on GTK3+. Free open software.
http://smuxi.im

Quassel - Multiplatform client. Allows detaching when away and connecting from mobile/other computers. Based on QT4/5. Free open software.
http://quassel-irc.org/


3. Linux
Note: While the links to the homepages are given, it is recommended, that you install the programs from your distribution's repositories (via rpm, apt, pacman, yum, etc.)

XChat - Multiplatform client. Based on GTK. Not recommended on KDE and other Qt-based desktop environments. Free open software.
http://xchat.org/

KVIrc - Multiplatform client. Lots of comfort functions. Recommended by Ascarion. Based on Qt. Usually works fine in GTK-environments. Free open software.
http://kvirc.net

Smuxi - Multiplatform client. Allows detaching when away and connecting from mobile/other computers. Based on GTK3+. Free open software.
http://smuxi.im

Quassel - Multiplatform client. Allows detaching when away and connecting from mobile/other computers. Based on QT4/5. Free open software.
http://quassel-irc.org/

Konversation - KDE default client. Based on Qt-4. Not as feature-rich as XChat or KVIrc. Free open software.
http://konversation.kde.org/


4. iPhone / iOS
Colloquy for iPhone - Shareware. http://colloquy.mobi/

IRC999 - Free. http://itunes.apple.com/de/app/irc999/id360698285?mt=8

5. Android
AndroIRC - The better choice according to Ascarion. It's not necessary to buy the premium version. Free and Premium versions.
http://www.androirc.com/

AndChat - Similarly feature-rich as AndroIRC. Free and Donate versions.
http://www.andchat.net/


6. Browser
ChatZilla - Addon for Firefox and other Mozilla programs. Free open software.
http://chatzilla.hacksrus.com/

Opera - Browser with inbuilt IRC client.
http://opera.com

Mibbit - IRC web application. No need to install anything. Not recommended for long term use. Ideal for internet cafes or the work place when you cannot install programs.
http://www.mibbit.com


7. Console
weechat - ncurses based command line client. Works on all unix-like systems and supposedly with Cygwin. Can bet detached when away and connected to from other computers. Free open software.
http://weechat.org/

irssi - Most famous command line client. Works on all unix-like Systems and on Windows with the help of Cygwin. Free open software.
http://irssi.org/

ircII - One of the oldest IRC clients still maintained. Free open software.
http://www.eterna.com.au/ircii/



4. ChanServ Commands

Access List Management
The access list determines who gets what level of access to a channel. This is based on so-called roles. For information on the default roles in use in Imperial channels see [1] and [2].
Add, change, delete entries from the access list:
Example:
Code:
/msg chanserv <#channel> add
/msg chanserv <#channel> set
/msg chanserv <#channel> del Code:
/cs access #cmg-empire-navy add John_Doe OAL1
/cs access #cmg-empire-navy set Ascarion OAL8
/cs access #cmg-empire-navy del Ascarion


Ban Management
In secured channels it often happens that people are banned. They can be unbanned via your client or a simple command if you at least hold operator status (+o, @) in the channel.
Example:
Code:
/mode <#channel> -b Code:
/mode #cmg-empire -b Ascarion!daniel@swc-irc.a7n.6m9.e6fk1s.IP

Note that if you choose this way, the hostmask of the ban set needs to be exactly matched. A second method is to utilize ChanServ. In Imperial channels this will often work if you hold any access role that grants halfop (+h, %). This is done as such:
Example:
Code:
/msg chanserv unban <#channel> [nickname|hostmask] Code:
/cs unban #cmg-empire
/cs unban #cmg-empire FADM_Ascarion
/cs unban #cmg-empire Ascarion!daniel@swc-irc.a7n.6m9.e6fk1s.IP

The first example here will make chanserv unban yourself, the second example is currently online nickname, the third example is a complete hostmask as above.

Channel registration
Register a channel as such:
Example:
Code:
/msg chanserv register <#channel> Code:
/cs register #cmg-empire-ipd

Securing the channel from unwanted intruders and hiding it from the channel list:
Example:
Code:
/msg chanserv set <#channel> restricted on
/msg chanserv set <#channel> mlock +ps Code:
/cs set #cmg-empire-ipd restricted on
/cs set #cmg-empire-ipd mlock +ps


Lastly to set up roles, follow the relevant steps of the guide in [2].




[1] #CMG-Empire Access Changes
[2] Imperial IRC Channel Access Policy


5. Server Issues

If you encounter the error "Unable to resolve server" there are several possible solutions.

Solution 1
Port Number options - IRC Server should be 'irc.swc-irc.com' and port should be '6667'. You can find this under Options>Connect>Server>Edit.
Alternative ports: 1080, 5000, 5555, 6660-6670, 8080

Solution 2
Just give it a few hours at it will sort itself out


Solution 3: try doing a tracert on irc.swc-irc.com / irc.swcombine.com
it should give you an ip address. now try the following
/server [ip address]. { currently /server 208.185.81.234:6667 }

to get the ip address info
start > run > cmd
tracert irc.swcombine.com
(on unix-like sytems, the command will be "traceroute" instead)


6. General Client Setup

This is a general description of sane IRC default settings regardless of client used. When following these settings you will be able to connect to the IRC server, have a NickServ account with two associated nicks and being auto-banned when having network trouble should be unlikely.

Server Setup

⦁ Primary Nickname: Your Handle. Names are usually separated by underscore. Example: John_Doe
⦁ Secondary Nickname: An alternative nickname, if the nickname is already taken. You should use your rank and last name. Example: RCT_Doe
⦁ Name: Either your handle or your name. Example: John Doe
⦁ Email: Your email address. Does not have to be a real email. Example: ⦁ johndoe@ascarion.net
⦁ IRC-Server: irc.swc-irc.com or irc.swcombine.com
⦁ Port: 6667.
⦁ Password: None.

Set up your NickServ account

Register your account. Make sure your nick is set to your Primary Nickname.
Example:
Code:
/nick [nickname]
/msg nickserv register [password] [email] Code:
/nick John_Doe
/ns register guinar johndoe@ascarion.org

Note: /ns is an abbreviation for /msg nickserv.

Link Secondary Nickname to main account.
Example:
Code:
/nick [nickname]
/msg nickserv group Code:
/nick RCT_Doe
/ns group


Whenever you connect to the IRC-Server you have to verify your identity by submitting your password:
Example:
Code:
/msg nickserv identify [password] Code:
/ns identify guinar



Auto-Identify
Some clients allow you to enter commands that will be executed immediatly after completing the connection and before attempting to join any channels. This is very useful for auto-identifying.
It sometimes happens on IRC, that you loose your connection to the server, but the server doesn't notice. In that case you nickname is already taken, when you reconnect. Your client will likely choose another nickname by some client-internal rule and you will get banned from channels. To prevent that from happening, this is a sane setup for auto-executed commands utilizing both of your nicknames.

Example:
Code:
/nick [Secondary_Nick]
/nick [Primary_Nick]
/msg nickserv identify [password] Code:
/nick RCT_Doe
/nick John_Doe
/ns identify guinar


Auto-Join
It is recommended to disable all auto-join features of your IRC client, even auto-joining on reconnect. Instead, make use of NickServs autojoin feature, that will only trigger when you identify. Thus you practically cannot enter channels unless identified and are safe from being banned.
These are the commands to list, add and delete channels from NickServs autojoin feature:
Example:
Code:
/msg nickserv ajoin list
/msg nickserv ajoin add [#channel]
/msg nickserv ajoin del [#channel] Code:
/ns ajoin list
/ns ajoin add #cmg-empire
/ns ajoin del #swc-members
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Teresa Rowley
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Posts : 148
Join date : 2015-12-31

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